The Fujifilm X100F is, conceptually, little different from the original that released in early 2011. Refinements are plenty, reaching the fourth generation (hence the F): focusing is way faster; sensor packs more megapixels (24 vs 12); and controls are more sensibly placed and functional, for example. But largely the same: overall retro-rangefinder styling; shape and size; emphasis on manual dial controls; leaf shutter; ND filter; dual optical and electronic viewfinders; and fixed f/2 lens, among others. Why change what is classic, and clever, from the start?

The Prime lens, matched with the 24.3-megapixel X-Trans CMOS III sensor, delivers fantastic IQ (e.g., image quality). Surprisingly, the X100F is more an action-cam that conceptually is in league with interchangeable siblings X-Pro2 and X-T2. Focus finally is fast enough. I got a good taste of both qualities while shooting surfers from Pacific Beach pier. Some of the best captures are black and white, applying Acros film simulation in camera. The Featured Image and two crops following below the fold demonstrate. 

There was no post-processing, other than cropping—slightly done to the first to remove a small portion of pier railing. The second recomposes for closer perspective.

The third is a 100-percent crop and shows what a sharp lens can deliver and how it can reduce need for bulky telephoto. Vitals for the set (again, all the same digital original): f/5.6, ISO 200, +0.33 ev, 1/950 sec, 23mm; 11:23 a.m. PDT. The positive exposure compensation is a slip of the fingers. I must have nicked the dial without realizing.

As my wife Anne and I started up Pacific Beach Drive towards our car, a couple of surfers stepped in front of us at a corner coming up from the ocean. Watching them pace ahead of us, I thought maybe they would rightly punctuate pics of surfers in the water. I captured two photos, from the hip, without looking at the viewfinder or back-LCD screen. Both images are usable, but I prefer this one, slightly cropped. Vitals: f/5.6, ISO 200, +0.33 ev, 1/480 sec, 23mm; 12:33 p.m. PDT.

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