Tag: photography

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The Cats of University Heights: Grasshopper

What a surprise this kitty is. In the same house where I saw Cricket looking out a window (onto Maryland)—May 27, 2019—here is another but peering out to Monroe. I wonder: Are there two (or more) beasties living in the home and do they territorially sit at windows facing different streets?

This fine feline is the series‘ fifty-eighth seen behind door or window. Because of the nickname given to the (presumed) house mate, let’s call her (or him) Grasshopper. I used Leica Q2 to capture the Featured Image, yesterday. Vitals, aperture manually set: f/5.6, ISO 100, 1/1250 sec, 28mm; 10:24 a.m. PST.

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The Cats of University Heights: Cobby

As Stern cautiously approached my wife and I, on Oct. 13, 2020, we mistakenly assumed he wanted some affection. Instead, his attention focused on a dark-striped tabby relaxed, but watchful, on a home’s steps. Neither animal was interested in us.

I used iPhone XS to capture the Featured Image from the sidewalk, which wasn’t close enough or best position for satisfying composition. Vitals: f/2.4, ISO 16, 1/63 sec, 52mm (film equivalent); 9:10 a.m. PST. The kitty earns nickname Cobby for appearing to be stocky—or so it seems from the distance and perspective.

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When You Can’t Serve People, Squirrels Must Do

The mom of Bruce, Guido, and Little—all of which appeared in my “Cats of University Heights” series—put out a clever, cutesy squirrel feeder. There is a sad sweetness to the gesture. She can’t serve people—no thanks to California Governor Gavin “Gruesome” Newsom’s order prohibiting all restaurant dining—and last I heard her employer might join the increasing list of local eateries and pubs put out of business.

In this County, SanDiegoVille keeps a running list of the permanently shuttered since the pandemic’s start. I count 115 eating or drinking establishments, but more when accounting for businesses with multiple locations.. Uncontrollable spread of COVID-19, which is caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2), demonstrates that forced closures are ineffective subduing the pandemic.

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Somebody is a Quick Study of Capitalism

Four days ago, I posted about the clever entrepreneur selling double-layer, home-made face masks for a buck. They’re a bargain no more! Since seeing the unattended sales display on Jan. 9, 2021 along Maryland Street in San Diego’s University Heights neighborhood, something changed—the price! Four dollars more—a 400-percent increase! Granted, the presentation is fancier, and Venmo payment is now accepted—with QR code option, no less.

Smooth sales tactics, reminiscent of retail operations everywhere, are evident in the “originally $10 each”, too. That’s not the price I photographed last week, hehe. I wonder why the change. Were too many selling at $1? Was the price below product cost? Were passersby abusing the honor system and stealing them? (Behavioral studies show that people are less likely to swipe things that are more valuable.)

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The Cats of University Heights: Stern

We celebrate this fine Caturday with the first of two kitties seen around the same property on Oct. 13, 2020. I used iPhone XS to capture the Featured Image and companion along Panorama Drive. Vitals: f/1.8, ISO 25, 1/1441 sec, 26mm (film equivalent); 9:08 a.m. PDT. The other: f/2.4, ISO 16, 1/209 sec, 52mm (film equivalent); 9:10 a.m.

Also seen on PD: BrickGem; GloryHawk; Herbie, The Love BugPoinsettia; Roadie; and Sparky. The tiger tabby earns nickname Stern, for serious look as it approached the territory where waited the next kitty to appear in the series—and also Finny, who had ambled over from his home on Adams.

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The Cats of University Heights: Demure

The the fifty-seventh beastie seen behind window or door appeared unexpectedly in the alley between Campus and Cleveland off Tyler on Nov. 25, 2020. Yep, we’re still plowing through a backlog of photographed but unpublished kitties. I used Leica Q2 to capture the Featured Image. Vitals, aperture manually set: f/5.6, ISO 100, 1/250 sec, 28mm; 9:27 a.m. PST.

This fine feline earns nickname Demure.

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You’re Not Living in North Park

On the same day—May 20, 2020—that I captured the official Boulevard sign near where El Cajon begins in San Diego’s University Heights neighborhood, my Leica Q2 also pointed along the comically named BLVD North Park. In real estate, location is everything, and if you can’t get the one you want, pretend and hope no one cares. The apartment complex emphatically is located in UH. But, hey, don’t tell the residents paying as much as $4,295 monthly for the birds-eye view of the graffiti art on abandoned commercial real estate, pandemic-lockdown zombified unemployed, or the ever-perennial homeless.

But from the tidy Featured Image (warning: 23MB file), with manicured sidewalk, big b, l, v, d, letters, and trendy corner brewery, you wouldn’t know what’s across El Cajon or up the way going towards Texas Street. This is my community, and I don’t really mean to diss it so much as croak some snark for people paying exorbitantly for the wrong neighborhood and when doing so driving up rental prices all across UH.

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The Cats of University Heights: Peek-a-Boo

Today, as my wife and I walked along Florida somewhere near Howard, Annie spotted a black-and-white shorthair strutting down the sidewalk and then jumping into the bushes—where we found it about 30 seconds later. While a little gruff looking in the Featured Image, this fine feline isn’t a stray. He (or she) wore a collar with bell and name tag (which I couldn’t read).

I understand if you roll your eyes at my calling the cat Peek-a-Boo. Okay, moving along, I manually focused Leica Q2 to make the moment. Vitals, aperture accidentally changed: f/6.3, ISO 200, 1/125 sec, 28mm; 10:15 a.m. PST.

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You Can Ride During the Pandemic, Why Not Eat?

I am a big fan of public transportation, particularly subway and trolley transits. No argument from me: During the SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2)—better known as COVID-19pandemic, public transportation is a necessary service that gets people without cars to the grocery store, pharmacy, or, if essential workers, to their jobs.

Something bothers me: If San Diegans are safe enough riding in an enclosed bus for, say, 20 to 40 minutes, why does California Governor Gavin “Gruesome” Newsom consider open-air dining to be risker and, therefore, is prohibited? I surely would worry much more about being inside a bus for any length of time, where riders feeling asphyxiated—particularly older folks who are more likely to be on board and are high-risk to catch COVID-19—pull down masks below their noses and even their mouths. Can you say super-spreader event? Because I surely can.