Tag: sports photography

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Flickr a Week 32: ‘Celebrate Brooklyn in Prospect Park | Deltron 3030 Concert Spectator’

The last of three consecutive entries discovered searching for “spectator” demonstrates how to get close in from far away. Michael Tapp captured self-titled “Celebrate Brooklyn in Prospect Park | Deltron 3030 Concert Spectator” on July 19, 2014, using an unidentified Sony Alpha camera (presumably) and Pentacon 135mm f/2.8 lens (certainly). If I owned an interchangeable lens camera, rather than fixed Leica Q2, 135mm would be my go-to focal length on Prime glass—as it was during the mid-Noughties when shooting Canon EOS 20D.

With “social distancing” the norm for the foreseeable post-pandemic future, time is right for street shooters to rediscover the mighty telephoto. A good one-thirty-five closes the distance—more so on APS-C cameras when applying the crop-factor—while delivering sharp detail and beautiful bokeh. Michael’s portrait is a keeper for both and excellent use of natural light. Unfortunately, EXIF isn’t available, which is typical of his photos; some photographers choose to expunge the metadata. 

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Flickr a Week 31a: ‘Defy Gravity’

The self-title of August’s first entry is a message to my daughter on her 26th birthday: “Defy Gravity“—something she needs to do, and perhaps all of us. Markus Binzegger used Olympus E-M10 Mark II and M.Zuiko 45mm F1.8 lens to make the moment, on July 15, 2017. Vitals: f/9, ISO 200, 1/640 sec, 45mm.

The stunning shot, second of three consecutively found by searching for “spectator”, is a keeper for composition (love the dude watching); stopped action (posture and leg positions really convey motion); storytelling (leap of—gulp—faith); and use of black and white (to keep attention on the two guys). Location, according to Markus: “Maggia River, Ticino, Switzerland”.

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Surfers in Black and White

The Fujifilm X100F is, conceptually, little different from the original that released in early 2011. Refinements are plenty, reaching the fourth generation (hence the F): focusing is way faster; sensor packs more megapixels (24 vs 12); and controls are more sensibly placed and functional, for example. But largely the same: overall retro-rangefinder styling; shape and size; emphasis on manual dial controls; leaf shutter; ND filter; dual optical and electronic viewfinders; and fixed f/2 lens, among others. Why change what is classic, and clever, from the start?

The Prime lens, matched with the 24.3-megapixel X-Trans CMOS III sensor, delivers fantastic IQ (e.g., image quality). Surprisingly, the X100F is more an action-cam that conceptually is in league with interchangeable siblings X-Pro2 and X-T2. Focus finally is fast enough. I got a good taste of both qualities while shooting surfers from Pacific Beach pier. Some of the best captures are black and white, applying Acros film simulation in camera. The Featured Image and two crops following below the fold demonstrate. 

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A Day at the (Pacific) Beach

My wife and I hauled off to the closest tourist beach earlier today; one of her favorite bead stores had advertised a sale. While she shopped, I walked down the Pacific Beach boardwalk. At 11:11 a.m. PDT, I came upon a blonde, back turned, tapping on a smartphone. Her shapely thighs, wavy hair, and posture beckoned for a spontaneous, stealth shot (no face). I grabbed the Fujifilm X100F, right-shoulder slung on the ONA Lima strap, and framed the moment—when she shifted position and turned to face me just as I clicked the shutter. Did she psychically feel the camera?

The close-cropped “Accidental Portrait” is the result. That’s the PB pier off to the right, BTW. Vitals, aperture manually set: f/11, ISO 200, +0.33 ev, 1/250 sec, 23mm. All color photos in this post were purposely shot with Classic Chrome film simulation but accidentally with the positive value exposure compensation. 

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Flickr a Day 53: The Racer

If you followed this series for the past 52 days, a pattern may be obvious. Not all, in fact not many, of the photographers are professionals. That’s particularly true for Bob Mical, whom I hope won’t be offended by my expressing such. The best pics aren’t those that stand as works of art but which matter most to you and to friends or family; and the story each image tells about these people.

I see in stand-out photography, particularly events, a quality Bob demonstrates: Willingness to get in, and get down if necessary, for the best shot. That quality makes this photo of a racer during the 2014 VA State Cyclocross Championships today’s selection. Sports photography isn’t easy, and should be more than stopping the action with the longest lens.